The Prayer of David

“But who am I, and what is my people, that we should be able thus to offer willingly? For all things come from you, and of your own have we given you. For we are strangers before you and sojourners, as all our fathers were. Our days on the earth are like a shadow, and there is no abiding. O Lord our God, all this abundance that we have provided for building you a house for your holy name comes from your hand and is all your own. I know, my God, that you test the heart and have pleasure in uprightness. In the uprightness of my heart I have freely offered all these things, and now I have seen your people, who are present here, offering freely and joyously to you. O Lord, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Israel, our fathers, keep forever such purposes and thoughts in the hearts of your people, and direct their hearts toward you. Grant to Solomon my son a whole heart that he may keep your commandments, your testimonies, and your statutes, performing all, and that he may build the palace for which I have made provision.” 1 Chronicles 29:15-19.

For a long time, David was not one of my favorite people in the Bible. I always had a bone to pick with him about Bathsheba, and her poor husband, Uriah. How, Lord, how could this be a man after your own heart? But if you read the Psalms David wrote, you can see that he was not one of his favorite people, either. Yet, he knew that to be a good ruler, he would have to walk in God’s forgiveness. Otherwise, he would remain estranged from God and be rejected. This is why he wrote:

Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered. Psalm 32:1

David was able to continue as a faithful man because he could accept God’s mercy. His devotion was pure, and he planned on God’s glory for his people’s future. He made preparations and he knew it was not all about him.

Father, help us all rediscover our first love and devotion to you, and let us return to the first works, as Jesus commanded. If we love Him, we will keep his commands. He loved us enough to die for us and send the Holy Spirit so we would be able.

The Prayer of David

“But who am I, and what is my people, that we should be able thus to offer willingly? For all things come from you, and of your own have we given you. For we are strangers before you and sojourners, as all our fathers were. Our days on the earth are like a shadow, and there is no abiding. O Lord our God, all this abundance that we have provided for building you a house for your holy name comes from your hand and is all your own. I know, my God, that you test the heart and have pleasure in uprightness. In the uprightness of my heart I have freely offered all these things, and now I have seen your people, who are present here, offering freely and joyously to you. O Lord, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Israel, our fathers, keep forever such purposes and thoughts in the hearts of your people, and direct their hearts toward you. Grant to Solomon my son a whole heart that he may keep your commandments, your testimonies, and your statutes, performing all, and that he may build the palace for which I have made provision.” 1 Chronicles 29:15-19.

For a long time, David was not one of my favorite people in the Bible. I always had a bone to pick with him about Bathsheba, and her poor husband, Uriah. How, Lord, how could this be a man after your own heart? But if you read the Psalms David wrote, you can see that he was not one of his favorite people, either. Yet, he knew that to be a good ruler, he would have to walk in God’s forgiveness. Otherwise, he would remain estranged from God and be rejected. This is why he wrote:

Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered. Psalm 32:1

David was able to continue as a faithful man because he could accept God’s mercy. His devotion was pure, and he planned on God’s glory for his people’s future. He made preparations and he knew it was not all about him.

Father, help us all rediscover our first love and devotion to you, and let us return to the first works, as Jesus commanded. If we love Him, we will keep his commands. He loved us enough to die for us and send the Holy Spirit so we would be able.

The Prayer of David

“But who am I, and what is my people, that we should be able thus to offer willingly? For all things come from you, and of your own have we given you. For we are strangers before you and sojourners, as all our fathers were. Our days on the earth are like a shadow, and there is no abiding. O Lord our God, all this abundance that we have provided for building you a house for your holy name comes from your hand and is all your own. I know, my God, that you test the heart and have pleasure in uprightness. In the uprightness of my heart I have freely offered all these things, and now I have seen your people, who are present here, offering freely and joyously to you. O Lord, the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Israel, our fathers, keep forever such purposes and thoughts in the hearts of your people, and direct their hearts toward you. Grant to Solomon my son a whole heart that he may keep your commandments, your testimonies, and your statutes, performing all, and that he may build the palace for which I have made provision.” 1 Chronicles 29:15-19.

For a long time, David was not one of my favorite people in the Bible. I always had a bone to pick with him about Bathsheba, and her poor husband, Uriah. How, Lord, how could this be a man after your own heart? But if you read the Psalms David wrote, you can see that he was not one of his favorite people, either. Yet, he knew that to be a good ruler, he would have to walk in God’s forgiveness. Otherwise, he would remain estranged from God and be rejected. This is why he wrote:

Blessed is he whose transgression is forgiven, whose sin is covered. Psalm 32:1

David was able to continue as a faithful man because he could accept God’s mercy. His devotion was pure, and he planned on God’s glory for his people’s future. He made preparations and he knew it was not all about him.

Father, help us all rediscover our first love and devotion to you, and let us return to the first works, as Jesus commanded. If we love Him, we will keep his commands. He loved us enough to die for us and send the Holy Spirit so we would be able.

You Won’t Have to Do It Alone

Then David said to Solomon his son, “Be strong and courageous and do it. Do not be afraid and do not be dismayed, for the Lord God, even my God, is with you. He will not leave you or forsake you, until all the work for the service of the house of the Lord is finished. And behold the divisions of the priests and the Levites for all the service of the house of God; and with you in all the work will be every willing man who has skill for any kind of service; also the officers and all the people will be wholly at your command.”

1 Chronicles 28:20-21.

This task must have been intimidating to Solomon. It was a big project, but this was also his father’s dream, not his. But David did not only pass on the dream, but the charge to live a life of obedience and faithfulness to God, so that the dream may become his own.

Jesus left us a dream of building His house, the church, which is the body of Christ. We were told to go, to make disciples and teach obedience to His commands. Instead, we have given our time, talent and treasure to church buildings, where we hear self-help topics so we’ll be blessed. We are not living God’s dream, but our own.

The King’s Friend

Jonathan, David’s uncle, was a counselor, being a man of understanding and a scribe. He and Jehiel the son of Hachmoni attended the king’s sons. Ahithophel was the king’s counselor, and Hushai the Archite was the king’s friend. Ahithophel was succeeded by Jehoiada the son of Benaiah, and Abiathar. Joab was commander of the king’s army. 1 Chronicles 27:32-34.

At the end of yet another long list of important staff members and other functionaries is this paragraph. In it you find someone who seems to have no other purpose but to be the king’s friend. This would have undoubtedly been Jonathan, had he lived. But even that might have been awkward since Jonathan was the son of the previous king. Hushai the Archite seems to be a guy with no baggage or other responsibilities. He probably got himself and the king a couple of beers at the end if the day and talked about hunting and fishing. Or even better, took David hunting and fishing when the throne was getting on his nerves.

Whatever he did, it’s a reminder that you need to make room for fun and relaxation. Maybe you need a friend. Or maybe you could be that friend. A friend is often closer than a brother, and will tell you things an employee won’t.

Jesus was called the friend of sinners. Did that mean people let their guard down around Him? We’re they on their best behavior? And if they were, was it because He intimidated them, or because He loved them?